Curriculum Handbook

Contents

PURPOSE. 6

GPA CALCULATION.. 6

END-OF-COURSE ASSESSMENTS (ECAs) CLASS OF 2012 AND AFTER. 6

ECA WAIVER. 7

SCHEDULE CHANGE POLICY. 8

GENERAL COLLEGE INFORMATION.. 8

AGRICULTURE. 9

5056: Fundamentals of Agricultural Science and Business. 9

5088: Agricultural Mechanization I 10

5088A: Agricultural  Mechanization II 10

5008: Animal Science. 10

5022: Farm Management. 11

5102: Food Science. 11

5132: Horticultural Science. 12

5180: Natural Resource Management. 12

BUSINESS EDUCATION.. 13

4524: Accounting I 13

4518: Business Foundations. 13

0521: Business Technology Assistant. 14

4574: Web Design I (MEDIA LITERACY). 14

4574A: Web Design II (DIGIDESIGNS). 14

4574B: Web Design III (DIGIDESIGNS). 15

CADET TEACHING EXPERIENCE. 15

1002: English 9 (WORLD STUDIES). 15

1004: English 10 (MEDIA LITERACY). 17

1006: English 11 (AMERICAN STUDIES). 18

1008: English 12 (POLITICAL STUDIES). 20

1086: Student Publications (DIGIDESIGNS). 21

1022: Biblical Literature. 22

4242: Theatre Arts. 22

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE. 23

5342: Nutrition & Wellness. 23

5340: Advanced nutrition and foods. 24

5362: Child Development and Parenting. 24

5380: Fashion & Textiles Foundations. 25

5394: Orientation to life and careers. 26

FINE ARTS. 26

4170: Advanced Concert Band. 26

4188: Advanced Chorus. 27

4208: Music Theory and Composition. 27

4200: Applied Music (HS Guitar Class). 28

Visual Arts Course Titles. 29

4000: Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art (L). 29

4004: Advanced Two-Dimensional Art (L). 29

4004: Advanced Two-Dimensional Art II (L). 30

4004: Advanced Two-Dimensional Art III (L). 30

4060: Drawing (L). 31

4064: Painting (L). 32

4002: Introduction to Three-Dimensional Art (L). 32

4006: Advanced Three-Dimensional Art (L). 33

4044: Sculpture (L). 33

4040: Ceramics (L). 34

4062: Photography (L). 35

WORLD LANGUAGES. 35

2120: Spanish I 35

2122: Spanish II 36

2124: Spanish III 37

2126: Spanish IV.. 37

2020: French I 38

2022: French II 39

2024: French III 40

2026: French IV.. 40

MATHEMATICS. 41

2520: Algebra I 41

2522: Algebra II 42

2532: Geometry. 42

4512: Business Math. 42

2564: Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry. 43

2562H: Calculus AB, Advanced Placement. 43

2562: Calculus. 44

SCIENCE. 44

3024: Biology I (L). 44

3026: Biology II (L). 45

3064: Chemistry I (L). 45

3066: Chemistry II 45

3066DC: Chemistry (L), Dual Credit. 46

3108: Integrated Chemistry-Physics (L). 46

3084: Physics (L). 47

5074: Advanced Life Science, Plants and Soils (L). 47

3008: Science Research, Independent Study (L). 48

SOCIAL STUDIES. 48

1540: United States Government (POLITICAL STUDIES). 48

1514: Economics (POLITICAL STUDIES). 49

1542: United States History (AMERICAN STUDIES). 49

1518: Indiana Studies. 50

1528: Modern World Civilization. 50

1548: World History and Civilization (WORLD STUDIES). 51

1532: Psychology. 51

1534: Sociology. 52

1538: Topics in History-“. 53

1538: Topics in History. 53

SECONDARY PHYSICAL EDUCATION.. 54

3506: Health and Wellness Education. 54

3542: Physical Education I (L). 54

3544: Physical Education II (L). 55

3560: Elective Physical Education (L). 56

TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION.. 56

5644: Introduction to Engineering Design. 56

5644P: Principles of Engineering. 57

5538 : Digital Electronics. 57

5644: Engineering Design and Development. 58

4780: Communication Systems. 59

4790: Communication Processes. 59

4782: Construction Systems. 59

4792: Construction Processes. 60

4784: Manufacturing Systems. 60

4796: Manufacturing Processes. 61

4786: Transportation Systems. 61

4798: Transportation Processes. 62

4804: Technology & Society. 62

4806: Technology Enterprises. 62

4808: Technology Systems. 63

CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION.. 63

5510: Automotive Services Technology. 63

5580: Building Trades Technology. 64

5802: Cosmetology. 65

5282: Health Careers. 66

Vincennes University Programs. 67

 


PURPOSE

The information contained within this book is designed to offer students and parents some guidelines for planning and pursuing a program of studies that will lead to high school graduation and prepare students for whatever path they choose after graduation.  You will find graduation requirements set forth by the State of Indiana and North Daviess Community Schools.  Four diploma types are available, and the requirements for each may be found in the first two pages of this book.
The main part of this book contains descriptions and requirements for all courses offered at North Daviess.  When planning your schedule, you will include required courses and elective courses.  These elective courses may be used to complete a selected career sequence, requirements for Academic Honors or Core 40, or to explore one’s interests.  

Current labor market trends show that some type of postsecondary training will be needed after high school.  This may consist of on-the-job training, apprenticeship programs, technical school, joining the military, or pursuing a university education.  Therefore, it is imperative that you obtain your high school diploma.  Because each individual is unique with his/her own talents and circumstances, students must choose which courses are best suited for his/her needs.  
The time to plan for the future is now!  Your high school education will set the stage for the rest of your life.  Please use this resource and all those available to you to better yourself for the future.  Your success depends on you!    

GPA CALCULATION

Grade Point Average (GPA) will be calculated giving points on a 4.0 non-weighted scale for grades divided by total credit attempted.  The GPA calculation will be extended to the third decimal point.  If a tie occurs after the third decimal point no tie breakers will be executed.  The calculation for valedictorian and salutatorian will be made at the end of the seventh semester; however, the final calculation for GPA on the transcripts will be made at the end of the eighth semester.

END-OF-COURSE ASSESSMENTS (ECAs) CLASS OF 2012 AND AFTER

Indiana is currently moving from the current GQE testing program to End-of-Course Assessments (ECAs). Students in the Class of 2012 and thereafter, will no longer be required to take the GQE. Students will be required to take and pass the End-of-Course Assessments in Algebra I (at the time they take the course, even if in 8th grade) and English 10 in addition to their credit requirements. The students will also be required to take End-of-Course Assessments in Biology I (a requirement of No Child Left Behind), Algebra II and English 11 (which will provide information regarding college readiness. The state is not yet requiring that these
additional ECAs be passed in order to graduate.
As we transition from the current GQE testing program to End-of-Course Assessments (ECAs) in Algebra 1 and English 10, it is possible for several different scenarios to occur with regard to these classes. The following guidance is provided in an effort to help you make academic decisions on behalf of your students.

ECA WAIVER

Students who do not earn a passing score on the Algebra I and English 10 ECAs need to discuss their options with their guidance counselor. There are two ways to receive an Indiana diploma without passing the ECAs.
1. Curriculum GPA:
- Complete the Core 40 requirements with a “C” or higher in all classes.
2. Curriculum Alternatives: ALL MUST BE MET
- Re-take the failed ECA at least one time each year.
- Maintain a 95% attendance rate after the first notification of not passing.
- Take advantage of at least one remediation opportunity per year.
- Obtain a “C” (1.67) average in any four semesters of Language Arts and a “C” (1.67) average in Mathematics.
- Maintain a “C” (1.67) or better in the 22 core credit hours required for an Indiana high school diploma.
- Obtain a recommendation from an English and Math teacher stating proficiency in those subject areas has been met.
- Verification of the above requirements provided by the principal.
• Special Education students must obtain a recommendation from the Case Conference Committee.

SCHEDULE CHANGE POLICY

Schedule changes will only be made if one of the following four conditions applies:
1. Student needs a higher level class because of a college or technical school requirement.
2. Student has an error on his/her schedule.
3. Student needs to make up a class because of a failure or required credit.
4. Student passed the course in summer school, and the schedule needs to be adjusted.
Drop/Add requests should be submitted within the first five days of a semester.
Schedules will not be changed because of teacher assigned or lunch hour.

GENERAL COLLEGE INFORMATION

                There are no set entrance requirements for all colleges and universities in the United States.  Each school has its own specific requirements for admission.  If a student is interested in a specific college, he or she should research the requirements for admission to that college.  
In the State of Indiana, Core 40 meets the recommended minimum requirements for most colleges and universities within the state.  It is therefore recommended that students who are planning to pursue a college education obtain a Core 40 diploma or higher.  
Courses taken and diploma type are not the only factors that admissions staff consider when looking at college applications.  Grade point average (GPA), class rank, SAT or ACT scores, and recommendations all play a role in deciding whether or not a student will be accepted for admission.  These are all things to keep in mind throughout your high school career.
During your junior year, you will take the PSAT, or Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test.  This test is not only a good way to help prepare for the SAT, but it may also help you to qualify for scholarships.  This test will also be offered to sophomores in the event that there are extra tests available.  It is recommended that you take the SAT or ACT during the spring of your junior year.  This way you have been able to practice with the PSAT and have had the opportunity to acquire more knowledge.  If your test scores are low, you may repeat the test during the summer before your senior year begins or early in the fall of your senior year.  College applications should be completed in the fall of your senior year.  It is extremely important that you pay attention to application and scholarship deadlines!  Financial aid forms (FAFSA) should be completed early in the second semester of the senior year.  This must be received by the federal government by March 10.  By completing all of these tasks, your chance for success is much greater!

Courses offered

  North Daviess Partnership with Oakland City
A.A. in General Studies
Program of Studies – minimum 64 hours (Grades must be C or Higher to count as Dual Credit)
Ability to take courses in sequence – will have option of applying for admissions to Oakland City after 10th grade completion

AGRICULTURE

5056: Fundamentals of Agricultural Science and Business        
Fundamentals of Agricultural Science and Business is a year long course which is highly recommended as a prerequisite and foundation for all other agricultural classes. The nature of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the fundamentals of agricultural science and business.  Topics to be covered include: animal science, plant and soil science, food science, horticultural science, farm and agribusiness management, landscape management, natural resources management, agricultural mechanization, and supervised agricultural experience.

5088: Agricultural Mechanization I  (Oakland City Course: W 101, 3hrs)
Agricultural Mechanization I is a year long course in which students develop an understanding of basic principles of selection, operation, maintenance, and management of agricultural production equipment. Topics covered include small gas engine repair, arc and gas welding, concrete, wood, and metal. Students are introduced to career opportunities in agricultural mechanization and related industries.

5088A: Agricultural  Mechanization II   (Oakland City Course: W 103, 3hrs)
Agricultural Mechanization II is a year long course in which students will take their knowledge from Agricultural Mechanization I and continue to an advanced level in engines, welding, concrete and electricity.

5008: Animal Science  
Animal Science is a year long course that provides students with an overview of the field of animal science.  All areas which the students study can be applied to large and small animals.  Topics to be addressed include:  anatomy and physiology, genetics, reproduction, nutrition, aqua culture, careers in animal science, common diseases and parasites, social and political issues related to the industry, and management practices for the care and maintenance of animals. 

5022: Farm Management 
This is a one semester course which introduces students to the principles of farm organization and management.  It covers the effects of good/poor management on a farm, economic principles, decision-making, methods for organizing and planning, getting started in the farming business, farm record keeping, and landscape management.

5102: Food Science
This is a one semester course that provides students with an overview of food science and its importance.  Introduction to principles of food processing, food chemistry, nutrition, food packaging, food commodities, food regulations, and careers in the food science industry help students understand the role which food science plays in the securing of a safe, nutritious, and adequate food supply.

 

5132: Horticultural Science (Oakland City Course: HT 101, 3 hrs)
This is a full year course designed to give students a background in the field of horticulture and landscaping and its many career opportunities.  It addresses the biology and technology involved in the production, processing, and marketing of horticultural plants and products. Topics covered include: reproduction and propagation of plants, plant growth, growth media, hydroponics, floriculture and floral design, management practices for field and greenhouse production, interior plantscapes, marketing concepts, production of herbaceous, woody and nursery stock, fruit, nut, and vegetable production, and integrated pest management, and employability skills.  Students participate in a variety of activities including extensive laboratory work usually in a school greenhouse.

5180: Natural Resource Management (Oakland City Course: BIO 105, 3hrs)
This is a one semester course that provides students with a background in natural resource management.  Students are introduced to career opportunities in natural resource management and related industries, the history of the forest industry and forest policy, the importance and uses of forest plants, factors which influence the development of forests, forest improvement and management, proper care and use of forest tools, effects of management practices on the environment, soil conservation practices, water and its importance to natural resource management, hazardous waste management, native wildlife, waterfowl and fish management, surveying and map use, management of recreational areas, outdoor safety and weather.  Taxidermy will also be explored in this class.

BUSINESS EDUCATION

4524: Accounting I

Accounting I is a business course that introduces the language of business using Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and procedures for proprietorships and partnerships using double-entry accounting.  Emphasis is placed on accounting principles as they relate to both manual and automated financial systems.  This course involves understanding, analyzing, and recording business transactions and preparing, analyzing, and interpreting financial reports as a basis for decision making.  Instructional strategies should include the use of computers, projects, simulations, case studies, and business experiences requiring the application of accounting theories and principles.

·        Recommended Grade Level:  10-12

·        Recommended Prerequisite:  Business Foundations, Algebra I

·        Credits: A two-credit course over two semesters

·        Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas 

 

4518: Business Foundations

Business Foundations is an introductory business course that provides the framework for pursuing additional business courses.  This core course acquaints students with economics, entrepreneurship, management, marketing, law, risk management, banking, personal finance, and careers in business.  The importance and application of business etiquette and ethics are included.  Opportunities may be provided for the student to participate in job shadowing, job mentoring, and other field experiences.  Instructional strategies may include simulations, projects, and cooperative ventures between the school and the community.

·        Recommended Grade Level:  9-10

·        Credits: A one- or two-credit course over one or two semesters

·        Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

 

0521: Business Technology Assistant
This course will allow students who are interested in computer repair, training, and troubleshooting, the opportunity to assist the technology coordinator and technicians.  Training will be offered to the student who will doing preventive maintenance, training teachers, developing web pages, troubleshooting, installing software, and setting up equipment.  Students will be working independently with teachers and staff at both buildings.

4574: Web Design I (MEDIA LITERACY) (Oakland City Course: CS 120, 3hrs)
Web Design is a business technology course that provides instruction in the principles of web design using HTML/XHTML and current/emerging software programs. Areas of instruction include audience analysis, hierarchy layout and design techniques, software integration, and publishing. Instructional strategies may include peer teaching, collaborative instruction, project-based learning activities, and school and community projects.

4574A: Web Design II (DIGIDESIGNS) (Oakland City Course: CS 220, 3hrs)
Web Design II is a career and technical education business course which will refine the web design skills the student learned in Web Design I.  This class is responsible for the athletic and clubs pages on the North Daviess Community Schools web site.

4574B: Web Design III (DIGIDESIGNS)
Web Design III is a career and technical education business course which will refine the web design skills the student learned in Web Design I.  This class will take over the leadership role in the creation of web pages for the North Daviess web page.

CADET TEACHING EXPERIENCE

                Cadet teaching provides students in grades 11 and 12 organized exploratory teaching experiences in grades kindergarten through grade 10.  This course provides a balance of class work relating to: (1) classroom organization, (2) classroom management, (3) the curriculum and instructional process, (4) observations of teaching, and (5) instructional experiences.  Evaluation is based upon the cadet teacher's cooperation, day-to-day practical performance, and daily log sheet.  Students must also keep a journal of their experiences.

ENGLISH

1002: English 9 (WORLD STUDIES) (Oakland City Course: ENG 201, 3hrs)
Through the integrated study of language, literature, writing, and oral communication, English 9 students further develop their use of language as a tool for learning and thinking and as a source of pleasure.  Students practice identifying, analyzing, and composing with different elements, structures, and genres of written language.  Literature instruction focuses on opportunities to:

        
The Composition component of language arts requires students to write for various audiences and purposes while strengthening skills in paragraph and multi-paragraph writing.  These include (1) having a hierarchy of ideas such as, thesis, supporting points, and specific examples; (2) the understanding of the paragraph as a formal structure, with a topic sentence; and (3) the understanding that composition (regardless of type) is an organized message from an author to a specific, identified audience. 

Using technology, students receive instruction and practice in the writing process.  This process includes: (1) prewriting, including summarizing, analyzing, and evaluating research; defining a problem or question; and outlining; (2) drafting; (3) revising, which includes obtaining, evaluating, and using feedback to rewrite the substance of the document; (4) editing, which includes attending to issues of spelling, grammar, punctuation, and style using a style manual, such as that of the Modern Language Association [MLA], Chicago Manual of Style, or American Psychological Association [APA]; and (5) publishing, which includes overall presentation, stylistic consistency, and electronic production.

Composition also provides opportunities to create multiple types of writing, including expository essays of persuasion and literary analysis, and technical writing assignments in various forms, including business letters, resumes, and laboratory reports. 
Oral communication (speech) emphasizes effective listening and speaking techniques and provides opportunities for students to integrate other reading and language arts skills as they learn to express ideas verbally.  Oral communication should incorporate correct grammar, usage, vocabulary, reading, and composition skills.  Student expectations emphasize both making presentations and being critical participants and listeners. 

1004: English 10 (MEDIA LITERACY) (Oakland City Course: Eng 202, 3hrs)
Language arts instruction, as with math and other disciplines, is cumulative.  Thus, English 10 reinforces and continues to make full use of many of the activities and skills of English 9.  Beyond these, English 10 adds the following emphasis: (1) consideration of a given canon of literature, usually American Literature; and (2) increased focus on the self-conscious choice of comprehension and writing strategies.  Literature instruction focuses on opportunities to:

In addition, students should be responsible for taking personal time for both instructional and recreational reading.
The Composition component of language arts provides students with opportunities to write for various audiences and purposes.  Students identify and employ various elements of good writing in well organized descriptive, expository, and narrative writings.  These elements include: (1) stating and supporting a point of view or opinion, (2) using transitions effectively to relate individual points and paragraphs to each other and to the main idea, (3) creating expository essays of persuasion and literary analysis, and (4) completing technical writing assignments.
Students use the basic modes of oral and written expression through the development of effective descriptive and narrative procedures, including focus and logical organization of ideas.  As a part of the writing process, students; (1) apply and use specialized reading skills in the content areas; (2) listen attentively and critically for different purposes and take appropriate notes; (3 ) interpret research by summarizing, analyzing, evaluating, and making decisions individually as well as in groups; (4) utilize rating scales and checklists for personal assessment, and (5) use a variety of technological tools in the learning process.  
The formal study of grammar, usage, spelling, and language mechanics is integrated into the study of writing.  Using technology, students receive instruction and practice in the writing process including prewriting, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing.  Students are encouraged to use one of the manuals of style such as Modern Language Association [MLA], American Psychological Association [APA], or the Chicago Manual of Style [CMS].
        Oral Communication (speech) provides students with opportunities to develop greater facility with choosing and employing different elements of effective oral communication.  Student expectations include: (1) using effective delivery techniques; (2) communicating responsibly, critically, and confidently on specialized topics when speaking in public; (3) creating and using technological devises in oral presentations; (4) using transitional devises effectively and using the proper style of delivery; (5) using proper social etiquette; and (6) demonstrating the various types of speeches and developing an effective personal delivery style.

1006: English 11 (AMERICAN STUDIES) (Oakland City Course: ENG 215, 3hrs)
Through the integrated study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication, English 11 students further develop their use of language as a tool for learning and thinking and as a source of pleasure.  In English 11, students move from predominantly analyzing and using the elements of written language to making judgments based on those analyses.  English 11also incorporates a literary canon, much of which is from a culture or time period different from that of the students – usually a survey of British Literature or American Literature from different periods.  Literature instruction focuses on opportunities to:

        The Composition component of language arts provides students with opportunities to produce a variety of forms including persuasive writing, synthesis and analysis of information from a variety of sources, completing complex forms, describing procedures, giving directions, and using graphic forms to support a thesis.
Thus, composition in Grade 11 continues to refine students’ abilities to articulate sophisticated ideas in an organized manner.  Increased sensitivity to context-audiences, purposes, and other environmental considerations-helps students better communicate their thoughts.  In addition, students develop greater facility with the back-and-forth movement between analysis and synthesis.  That is, students analyze sources with increasing attention to detail while they synthesize or compose written texts, using these analyses in accordance with a given purpose such as persuasion, exposition, descriptions, and so forth.
The formal study of grammar, usage, spelling, and language mechanics is integrated into the study of writing.  Using technology, students receive instruction and practice in the writing process including prewriting, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing.  Students are encouraged to use one of the manuals of style such as Modern Language Association [MLA], American Psychological Association [APA], or the Chicago Manual of Style [CMS].
        Oral Communication (speech) continues to emphasize effective listening and speaking techniques.  This includes providing opportunities for students to integrate other reading and language arts skills as they incorporate correct, grammar, usage, vocabulary, reading, and composition skills while learning to express ideas verbally.
Grade 11 increasingly calls attention to the contexts in which oral communication takes place.  Student expectations include: (1) communicating in academic and non-academic language environments; (2) communicating responsibly, critically, and confidently on specialized topics when speaking in public; (3) analyzing speech in terms of socio-cultural values, attitudes, and assumptions; (4) enhancing speaking with appropriate nonverbal cues; (5) adapting to physical, professional, and student speeches on content and delivery; and (7) demonstrating a basic knowledge of parliamentary procedure. 

1008: English 12 (POLITICAL STUDIES)

Semester 1:(Oakland City Course: ENG 101, 3hrs)

Semester 2:(Oakland City Course: ENG 102, 3hrs)


Grade 12 continues to refine students’ ability and desire to learn and communicate about language and literature.  While students developed judgments informed by keen literary analysis in Grades 9-11, in Grade 12 they practice explaining and defending their readings to others.  In addition, the emphasis on different cultural contexts is intensified in a focus on world literature.  To negotiate these texts, students learn to identify and communicate about the broad themes, trends, and cultural issues present in world literature.  Literature instruction focuses on opportunities to:

        The Composition component of English 12 continues to provide students with opportunities to hone their writing.  Writing at this stage has: (1) a clearly identified audience, (2) a well articulated purpose and thesis, and (3) a structured body that fulfills its stated purpose and supports its thesis in a way accessible to its audience.  Writing at this stage is also well informed by careful research and intelligent analysis.  
Using technology, students are able to produce polished final documents.  Polished writing requires following through with all phases of the writing process (prewriting, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing), at which all students should be proficient.  All writing should meet the four criteria outlined above and have been through all stages of the process just described, including persuasive writing, synthesis and analysis of information from a variety of sources, and reflective essays.  

Students are also able to complete complex forms, describe procedures, give directions, and use graphic forms to support a thesis.  The formal study of grammar, usage, spelling, and language mechanics is integrated into the study of writing.  Students are encouraged to use one of the manuals of style such as Modern Language Association [MLA], American Psychological Association [APA], or the Chicago Manual of Style [CMS].
        Oral Communication (speech) continues to emphasize the organization of ideas, awareness of audience, and sensitivity to context in carefully researched and well organized speeches.  Student expectations include: (1) presenting facts and arguments effectively; (2) analyzing speeches in terms of socio-cultural values, attitudes, and assumptions; (3) recognizing when another does not understand the message being delivered; (4) utilizing Aristotle’s three modes of proof; (5) utilizing elementary logic such as deductive, inductive, causal, and analogical forms of reasoning; and (6) expressing and defending, with evidence, one’s thesis.

1086: Student Publications (DIGIDESIGNS)   (Oakland City Course: ENG 406y, 1hrs)
This course involves the production of the yearbook, offering opportunities in writing, photography, teamwork and technology.  All phases of yearbook development—copywriting, designing, photography and desktop publishing, are included.  Students further develop communication skills through contacts with businesses and school community in selling advertisements and yearbook subscriptions.  Additionally, students grow in responsibility, independence, leadership and teamwork.

1022: Biblical Literature (Oakland City Course: BIB 205, 3hrs)
Get ready to explore The Bible, a collection of books that have had a profound impact on the history of the world and the way we live today.  In Biblical Literature, students will have the opportunity to do a close reading of the New Testament, and to relate these writings to literature and history.  One primary source we will use is the King James Version, but other sources are welcome to supplement our readings.  As a class, we will attempt to learn the mysteries of this language and to relate it to the events of our time.

4242: Theatre Arts
So you wanna be an actor?  Or maybe the front of the stage isn’t for you, but you enjoy working behind the scenes.  If you fall into either of these categories, then this is the class that you have been waiting for!  Students in Drama will explore a full semester of excitement by learning through a project-based learning style that existed before the PBL label was given.  We will learn about the basics of theatre, and students will have the opportunity to choose a specialty area to apply to a live show in front of an audience.  Areas studied will include acting, directing, stage management, stagecraft, lighting, sound, costume, and makeup.  As a class, we will decide the details of the show.

 

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE

5342: Nutrition & Wellness (Oakland City Course: CA 125, 3hrs)
Foods, Nutrition and Wellness enables students to realize the components and lifelong benefits of sound nutrition and wellness practices and empowers them to apply these principles in their everyday lives.  Topics include impact of daily nutrition and wellness practices on long-term health and wellness; physical, social, and psychological aspects of healthy nutrition and wellness choices; planning for wellness and fitness/selection and preparation of nutritious meals and snacks; safety, sanitation, storage, and recycling processes and issues associated with nutrition and wellness; and impacts of technology on nutrition and wellness career paths.  Laboratory experiences will emphasize both nutrition and wellness practices.

 

5340: Advanced nutrition and foods

Advanced Nutrition and Foods is a sequential course that builds on concepts from Nutrition and Wellness or Culinary Arts Foundations. This course addresses more complex concepts in nutrition and foods, with emphasis on contemporary issues, or on advanced special topics such as International, Regional, and/or Cultural Foods; Food Science, Nutrition, or Dietetics; or with emphasis on a particular aspect of the food industry, such as Baking, Catering, or Entrepreneurial Endeavors. Higher order thinking, communication, leadership and management processes will be integrated in classroom and laboratory activities. Topics include: In-depth study of daily nutrition and wellness throughout the life span; Acquiring, organizing, and evaluating information about foods and nutrition; Selecting and preparing nutritious meals; Safety and sanitation in food production; Meal planning and preparation for specific economic, psychological, and nutritional needs; Community and world food concerns, including scarcity and hunger; Advanced impacts of science and technology on nutrition, food, and related tools and equipment; Exploring careers in nutrition and food industries. Laboratory experiences with advanced applications are required. School-based entrepreneurial enterprises, field-based observations/experiences or internships, and service learning activities are recommended.

·        Recommended Grade Level:  Grade 10 and up

·        Recommended Prerequisites:  Nutrition and Wellness or permission of instructor

·        Credits:  One-semester or two-semester course, one credit per semester - course may be repeated for up to four semesters to accommodate a variety of special topics in advanced nutrition and foods

·        A Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors, and Core 40 with Technical Honors diploma elective and directed elective course

5362: Child Development and Parenting

Child Development and Parenting addresses the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors associated with supporting and promoting optimal growth and development of infants and children. A project-based approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, and management processes is recommended in order to integrate suggested topics into the study of child development and parenting. The focus is on research-based nurturing and parenting practices and skills, including brain development research, that support positive development of children. Topics include consideration of the roles, responsibilities and challenges of parenthood; human sexuality; adolescent pregnancy; prenatal development; preparation for birth; the birth process; meeting the physical, social, emotional, intellectual, moral, and cultural growth and developmental needs of infants and children; impacts of heredity, environment, and family and societal crisis on development of the child; meeting children's needs for food, clothing, shelter, and care giving; caring for children with special needs; parental resources, services, and agencies; and career awareness. Applications through authentic settings such as volunteer experiences, internships, and service learning are encouraged. This course is recommended for all students regardless of their career cluster or pathway to build basic parenting skills and is especially appropriate for students with interest in human services and education-related careers.

5380: Fashion & Textiles Foundations 
Textiles and fashion technologies:  Addresses knowledge and skills related to design, production, acquisition, and distribution in the textiles and fashion areas.  The class covers consumer options for fashion, textiles; care and maintenance of textile products, equipment and tools; and construction and alteration skills.  Students will use different methods to apply designs to fabrics and will construct projects (wearing apparel and household, craft item.)

5394: Orientation to life and careers

Orientation to Life and Careers addresses essential knowledge, skills, and behaviors all students need to live successfully in today’s world.  A project-based approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, and management processes is recommended in order to integrate suggested topics into the study of life and careers.  The focus of the course is the impact of today’s choices on tomorrow’s possibilities.  Topics to be addressed include higher order thinking, communication, leadership, and management processes; exploration of personal aptitudes, interests, principles, and goals; life and career exploration and planning; examining multiple life roles and responsibilities as individuals and family members; planning and building employability skills; transferring school skills to life and work; decision making and organizational skills; and managing personal resources.  The opportunity for ninth graders to develop Four-Year Course Plans can be included, based on local curriculum needs.  Four-Year Plans should be developed with counselor participation.  Personal and career portfolios should be developed or upgraded with the cooperation of others, especially the business and/or language arts teachers.  This is a foundational course designed to teach knowledge and life skills that are essential for ALL high school students regardless of their career cluster or pathway.

·        Recommended Grade Level:  Grade 9 and up

·        Recommended Prerequisites:  None

·        Credits:  One-semester or two-semester course, one credit per semester

·        Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas 

·        One of the six FACS courses from which students may choose three to fulfill the required Health and Wellness credit - see State Rule 511 IAC 6-7-6 (6)

·        One of the two courses from which schools must choose one to teach at a minimum of once every year in order to qualify for state vocational funding - see State Rule 511 IAC 6.1-5.1-10.1 (c)

 

FINE ARTS

4170: Advanced Concert Band (Oakland City Course: MUS 455, 1hrs)
Advanced concert band is a performing instrumental group and is open to any student in high school who currently plays a brass, woodwind or percussion instrument. Scales, ability to sight read, playing basic rhythms, playing in tune, individuals tone, and articulation are factors considered essential.  Students are required to participate in performance opportunities outside of the school day that support and extend learning in the classroom.  Throughout the school year the band will perform at concerts, contests, parades, and other extra-curricular events, including football and basketball games.

4188: Advanced Chorus (Oakland City Course: MUS 109, 1hrs)
This elective class is open to all students in Grades 9-12 who want to learn how to read and perform vocal music.  Course work includes written and oral requirements which involve study in the areas of performance, history, theory, and music reading skills.  Participation in concerts and contests is mandatory.  Previous experience in music is helpful, but a positive attitude toward work and learning are the only requirements.

4208: Music Theory and Composition (Oakland City Course: MUS 111, 3hrs)
Students taking this course develop skills in the analysis of music and theoretical concepts.  Students:  develop ear training and dictation skills, understand chordal and harmonic structures and analysis, understand modes and scales,  study a wide variety of musical styles,  study traditional music notation and sound sources as tools for musical composition, and receive detailed instruction in other basic elements of music, and study music history. Students have the opportunity to experience live performances, by professionals, during and outside of the school day.

4200: Applied Music (HS Guitar Class) (Oakland City Course: MUS 235, 3hrs)
Applied Music offers high school students the opportunity to receive small group or private instruction designed to develop performance skills.  Instruction is designed so that students are enabled to connect, examine, imagine, define, try, extend, refine, and integrate music study into other subject areas.  A variety of music methods and repertoire is utilized to refine students’ abilities in listening, analyzing, interpreting, and performing.

 

 

 

 

 

Visual Arts Course Titles

 

4000: Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art (L)

Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students taking this course engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, production, and integrated studies and lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. Students explore historical and cultural background and connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; create two-dimensional works of art, reflect upon the outcomes, and revise their work; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. They identify ways to utilize and support art museums, galleries, studios, and community resources.

·        Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, or 12

·        Credits: a 1-semester course for 1 credit

·        Fulfills requirement for 1 of 2 Fine Arts credits for Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma

·        Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

 

4004: Advanced Two-Dimensional Art (L)  (Oakland City course ART 110, 3 hours)

Advanced Two-Dimensional Art is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students in this course build on the sequential learning experiences of Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production and lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. Students explore historical and cultural background and connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; create two-dimensional works of art, reflect upon the outcomes, and revise their work; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. They identify ways to utilize and support art museums, galleries, studios, and community resources.

·        Recommended Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, or 12

·        Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art (L)

·        Fulfills requirement for 1 of 2 Fine Arts credits for Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma

4004: Advanced Two-Dimensional Art II (L)

Advanced Two-Dimensional Art is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students in this course build on the sequential learning experiences of Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art and Advanced Two-Dimensional Art that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production and lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. Students explore historical and cultural background and connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; create two-dimensional works of art, reflect upon the outcomes, and revise their work; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. They identify ways to utilize and support art museums, galleries, studios, and community resources.

·        Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11, or 12

·        Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art (L)

·        Laboratory course

·        Fulfills requirement for 1 of 2 Fine Arts credits for Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma

Credits: a 1-semester course for 1 credit. The nature of this course allows for successive semesters of instruction at an advanced level provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized.

·        Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

 

4004: Advanced Two-Dimensional Art III (L)

Advanced Two-Dimensional Art is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students in this course build on the sequential learning experiences of Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art, Advanced Two-Dimensional Art, and Advanced Two-Dimensional Art II that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production and lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. Students explore historical and cultural background and connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; create two-dimensional works of art, reflect upon the outcomes, and revise their work; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. They identify ways to utilize and support art museums, galleries, studios, and community resources.

·        Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11, or 12

·        Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art (L), Advanced Two-Dimensional Art (L), Advanced Two-Dimensional Art II (L)

·        Laboratory course

·        Fulfills requirement for 1 of 2 Fine Arts credits for Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma

 

4060: Drawing (L)

Drawing is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students in drawing engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production and lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. Students create drawings utilizing processes such as sketching, rendering, contour, gesture, and perspective drawing and use a variety of media such as pencil, chalk, pastels, charcoal, and pen and ink. They reflect upon and refine their work; explore cultural and historical connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. Students utilize the resources of art museums, galleries, and studios, and identify art-related careers.

·        Recommended Grade Level: 11 or 12

·        Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art (L)

·        Laboratory course

·        Credits: a 1-semester course for 1 credit. The nature of this course allows for successive semesters of instruction at an advanced level provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized.

·        Fulfills requirement for 1 of 2 Fine Arts credits for Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma

·        Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

 

 

4064: Painting (L)

Painting is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students taking painting engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production that lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. Students create abstract and realistic paintings, using a variety of materials such as mixed media, watercolor, oil, and acrylics as well as techniques such as stippling, gouache, wash, and impasto. They reflect upon and refine their work; explore cultural and historical connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. Students utilize the resources of art museums, galleries, and studios, and identify art-related careers.

·        Recommended Grade Level: 11 or 12

·        Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art (L)

·        Laboratory course

·        Credits: a 1-semester course for 1 credit. The nature of this course allows for successive semesters of instruction at an advanced level provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized.

·        Fulfills requirement for 1 of 2 Fine Arts credits for Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma

·        Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

 

 

 

4002: Introduction to Three-Dimensional Art (L)

Introduction to Three-Dimensional Art is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students taking this course engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, production, and integrated studies and lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. Students explore historical and cultural background and connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; create three-dimensional works of art, reflect upon the outcomes, and revise their work; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. They identify ways to utilize and support art museums, galleries, studios, and community resources.

·        Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11, or 12

·        Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art (L)

·        Laboratory course

·        Credits: a 1-semester course for 1 credit

·        Fulfills requirement for 1 of 2 Fine Arts credits for Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma

·        Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

 

4006: Advanced Three-Dimensional Art (L)  (Oakland City course ART 111, 3 hours)

Advanced Three-Dimensional Art is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students in this course build on the sequential learning experiences of Introduction to Three-Dimensional Art that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production and lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. Students explore historical and cultural background and connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; create three-dimensional works of art, reflect upon the outcomes, and revise their work; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. They identify ways to utilize and support art museums, galleries, studios, and community resources.

·        Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11, or 12

·        Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art (L), Introduction to Three-Dimensional Art (L)

·        Laboratory course

·        Credits: a 1-semester course for 1 credit. The nature of this course allows for successive semesters of instruction at an advanced level provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized

·        Fulfills requirement for 1 of 2 Fine Arts credits for Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma

·        Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

 

4044: Sculpture (L)

Sculpture is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students in sculpture engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production. Using materials such as plaster, clay, metal, paper, wax, and plastic, students create portfolio quality works. Students at this level produce works for their portfolios that demonstrate a sincere desire to explore a variety of ideas and problems. They create realistic and abstract sculptures utilizing subtractive and additive processes of carving, modeling, construction, and assembling. They reflect upon and refine their work; explore cultural and historical connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. Students utilize the resources of art museums, galleries, and studios, and identify art-related careers.

·        Recommended Grade Level: 11 or 12

·         Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art (L), Introduction to Three-Dimensional Art (L)

·        Laboratory course

·        Credits: a 1-semester course for 1 credit. The nature of this course allows for successive semesters of instruction at an advanced level provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized.

·        Fulfills requirement for 1 of 2 Fine Arts credits for Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma

·        Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

 

4040: Ceramics (L)

Ceramics is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students in ceramics engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production and lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. Students create works of art in clay utilizing the processes of hand building, molds, wheel throwing, slip and glaze techniques, and the firing processes. They reflect upon and refine their work; explore cultural and historical connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. Students utilize the resources of art museums, galleries, and studios, and identify art-related careers.

·        Recommended Grade Level: 11 or 12

·        Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art (L), Introduction to Three-Dimensional Art (L)

·        Laboratory course

·        Credits: a 1-semester course for 1 credit. The nature of this course allows for successive semesters of instruction at an advanced level provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized

·        Fulfills requirement for 1 of 2 Fine Arts credits for Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma

·        Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

4062: Photography (L)

Photography is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students in photography engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production and lead to the creation of portfolio quality works, creating photographs, films, and videos utilizing a variety of digital tools and dark room processes. They reflect upon and refine their work; explore cultural and historical connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. Students utilize the resources of art museums, galleries, and studios, and identify art-related careers.

·        Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11, or 12

·        Recommended Prerequisites: Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art (L)

·        Laboratory course

·        Credits: a 1-semester course for 1 credit. The nature of this course allows for successive semesters of instruction at an advanced level provided that defined proficiencies and content standards are utilized.

·        Fulfills requirement for 1 of 2 Fine Arts credits for Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma

·        Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas

 

 

WORLD LANGUAGES

2120: Spanish I 
Spanish I provides instruction enabling students to discuss the many reasons for learning languages and to develop an understanding of the people who speak them. Students are able to apply effective strategies for language learning and show a willingness to experience various aspects of the cultures.  Students are able to: make routine requests in the classroom and in public places; understand and use appropriate forms of address in courtesy expressions; ask and answer simple questions and participate in brief guided conversations related to their needs and interests; read isolated words and phrases in a situational context, such as menus, signs, and schedules; comprehend brief written directions and information; read short narrative texts on simple topics; and write familiar words and phrases in appropriate contexts and respond in writing to various stimuli.   Additionally, students learn: about nonverbal communication, such as gestures and body language; about awareness of current events in the cultures; the major holidays and geographical features of the countries being studied; greeting and leave taking behaviors in a variety of social situations.

2122: Spanish II 
Spanish II enables students to participate in classroom and extracurricular activities related to the language studied as well as to participate in conversations dealing with daily activities and personal interests.  Students are able to: ask questions regarding routine activities; participate in conversations on a variety of topics; relate a simple narrative about a personal experience or event; interact in a variety of situations to meet personal needs; understand main ideas and facts from simple texts over familiar topics; read aloud with appropriate intonation and pronunciation; and write briefly in response to given situations.  Additionally, students become: familiar with major geographical features, historical events, and political structures of the country(ies) being studied; and familiar with different aspects of the culture, including architecture, literature and music.

2124: Spanish III (Oakland City Course: SPAN 101, 4hrs)
Spanish III provides instruction enabling students to understand and appreciate other cultures by comparing social behaviors and values of people using the languages being learned. Students are willing to initiate and participate in discussions concerning these cultures. In addition, students are able to: respond to factual and interpretive questions and interact in a variety of social situations; read for comprehension from a variety of authentic materials; read short literary selections of poetry, plays, and short stories; complete authentic forms and documents and take notes that require familiar vocabulary and structures; write paraphrases, summaries, and brief compositions; describe different aspects of the culture, using the foreign language where appropriate; and seek help in a crisis situation and participate appropriately at special family occasions.

2126: Spanish IV (Oakland City Course: SPAN 102, 4hrs)
Spanish IV enables students to participate in classroom and extra-curricular activities related to the language studied. Students are willing to participate in conversations with native and advanced non-native speakers, either in their community or in the school. This course also enables students to: respond to factual and interpretive questions, interact in complex social situations, and express opinions and make judgments; give presentations on cultural topics including: (1) traditions, (2) historical and contemporary events, and (3) major historical and artistic figures; paraphrase or restate what someone else has said; read for comprehension from a variety of longer authentic materials, such as newspapers and magazine articles, novels, and essays, as well as make judgments about what is read; write well-organized compositions on a given topic; and  begin using the language creatively in writing simple poetry and prose.Students are also: aware of the relationship between various art forms in at least one major historical period; aware of the major literary, musical, and artistic periods and genres of at least one of the cultures in which the language is spoken; and able to adjust speech appropriate to the situation and audience.

2020: French I
This course introduces the student to language learning and the culture of the French speaking world by means of Project Based Learning.  Students will have an opportunity to explore the many reasons for learning French and develop an understanding of the people who speak it and how this all relates to 21st century learning skills and our global society.  Students will apply effective learning strategies for language acquisition while increasing their personal skills to make them successful in life beyond high school.  Students will partake in various experiences related to the French culture and how it can be brought into our own culture.  Within the context of this course and the projects completed, the students will have the opportunity to achieve these tasks in the French language:
*respond to and give oral directions and commands to make routine request in the classroom and in public areas 
*understand and use appropriate forms of address in courtesy expressions and be able to tell about daily routines and events
*ask and answer simple questions and participate in brief structured conversations related to their needs and interests
*read isolated words and phrases in provided contexts, such as menus, signs, and schedules
*comprehend brief written directions and information
*read short narrative texts on simple topics; and 
*write familiar words and phrases in appropriate contexts and respond in writing to various stimuli
Students will also learn:
*about awareness of current events in cultures
*the major holidays and geographical features of the countries to be studied
*greeting and leave taking behaviors in a variety of social situations
*appropriate way to respond to introductions and use courtesy behaviors
*appropriate etiquette in a variety of social settings.

2022: French II 
This course gives students the chance to participate in classroom and extracurricular activities related to the language studied as well as to participate in conversations dealing with daily activities and personal interests. This will all be accomplished in a classroom environment that will employ Project Based Learning.  Students will continue to explore the many reasons for learning French and develop an understanding of the people who speak it and how this all relates to 21st century learning skills and our global society.  Students will continue to apply effective learning strategies for language acquisition while increasing their personal skills to make them successful in life beyond high school.  Students will partake in various experiences related to the French culture and how it can be brought into our own culture.  Within the context of this course and the projects completed, the students will have the opportunity to achieve these tasks in the French language:
Students will be able to:
*ask questions regarding routine activities.
*participate in conversations on a variety of topics
*relate a simple narrative about a personal experience or event
*interact in a variety of situations to meet personal needs, such as asking permission, asking for or responding to an offer of help, and expressing preferences in everyday life
*understand main ideas and facts from simple texts over familiar topics
*read aloud with appropriate intonation and pronunciation
*write briefly in response to given situations, for example postcards, personal notes, phone messages, and directions, as well as write letters using culturally appropriate  format and style
Students will also become:
*familiar with major geographical features, historical events, and political structures of the countries being studied
*familiar with different aspects of the culture, including the visual arts, architecture, literature and music, using the foreign language where appropriate
*able to extend and respond to hospitality as a host or guest
*aware of time expectations, such as arriving for appointments and social engagements.

2024: French III (Oakland City Course: FRN 101, 4hrs)
This course will provide instruction allowing the students to understand and appreciate other cultures by comparing social behaviors and values of people using the languages being learned and making use of Project Based Learning.  Students will continue the  opportunity to explore the many reasons for learning French and develop an understanding of the people who speak it and how this all relates to 21st century learning skills and our global society.  Students will apply effective learning strategies for language acquisition while increasing their personal skills to make them successful in life beyond high school.  Students will partake in various experiences related to the French culture and how it can be brought into our own culture.  Within the context of this course and the projects completed, the students will have the opportunity to achieve these tasks in the French language:
*Respond to factual and interpretive questions and interact in a variety of social situations, such as expressing regrets, condolences, and complaints, and using more than rote memory formula phrases
*Read for comprehension from a variety of authentic materials, such as advertisements in newspapers and magazines, cartoons, and personal correspondence
*Read short literary selections of poetry, plays, and short stories
*Complete authentic forms and documents and take notes that require familiar vocabulary and structures
*Describe different aspects of the culture, using foreign language where appropriate, including major historical events, political structures, values systems, visual arts, architecture, literature, and music
*Seek help in a crisis situation and participate appropriately at special family occasions such as birthdays, weddings, funerals, and anniversaries

2026: French IV (Oakland City Course: FRN 102, 4hrs)
This course will enable students to participate in classroom and extra-curricular activities related to the French, such as making presentations to other classes, teaching younger students, and taking leadership roles in language club while making use of Project Based Learning.  Students will be able to converse with native and non-native speakers of French, either in the community or at school.   This course will continue to help students in developing 21st century learning skills and assist students with being prepared to enter our global society. Within the context of this course and the projects completed, the students will have the opportunity to achieve these tasks in the French language:
*Respond to factual and interpretive questions, interact in complex social situations, and express opinions and make judgments
*Give presentations on cultural topics including: traditions, historical and contemporary events, and major historical and artistic figures
*Paraphrase or restate what others have said
*Read for comprehension from a variety of longer authentic materials, such as newspaper and magazine articles, novels, essays, as well as make judgments about what is read
*Write well-organized compositions on a given-topic
*Begin using the language creatively in writing simple poetry and prose
Students will also be:
*aware of the relationship between various art forms in at least one major historical period
*aware of the major literary, musical, and artistic periods and genres of at least one of the cultures in which the language is spoken
*able to adjust speech appropriately to the situation and audience
*able to participate appropriately in a variety of specific circumstances which could include public meetings, attending concerts, and using public transportation

MATHEMATICS

2520: Algebra I (Oakland City Course: MATH 101, 3hrs)
In Algebra I, students will be introduced to functions, rules of exponents, graphing equations and inequalities, solving systems of equations and inequalities, basic math operations of polynomials, and solving quadratic functions using a variety of methods.  Concepts will be taught using project based learning with the five school learning outcomes (content literacy, written communication, oral communication, collaboration, and work ethic) used as evaluation tools.

2522: Algebra II     (Oakland City Course: MATH 115, 3hrs)
In Algebra II, students will be introduced to linear and absolute value equations, complex numbers, quadratic equations and functions, polynomial equations and functions, exponential and logarithmic equations, sequences and series, and combinatorics and probability using various methods.  Concepts will be taught using project based learning with the five school learning outcomes (content literacy, written communication, oral communication, collaboration, and work ethic) used as evaluation tools.

2532: Geometry  
In geometry, students will explore ideas related to points, lines, angles, planes, polygons, quadrilaterals, triangles, circles, polyhedral and other solids.  There will be a focus on inductive reasoning and formal proofs.

4512: Business Math 
Business math is designed to develop the ability to solve real world problems in order to become productive citizens and workers in a technological society.  Areas of study to be included are number relationships and operations; patterns and algebra; measurements; and statistics and probability.  Problem-solving applications will be used to analyze and solve business problems for such areas as taxation; savings and investments; payroll records; cash management; financial statements; purchases; sales; inventory records; and depreciation.

2564: Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry (Oakland City Course: MATH 120, 3hrs)
Students taking this course will learn about relations, basic functions, logarithmic functions, exponential functions, trigonometric functions, trigonometric identities, trigonometric equations, polar coordinates, complex numbers, sequences, series, and data analysis. **A TI-82 graphing calculator is required.

2562H: Calculus AB, Advanced Placement  
Calculus AB, Advanced Placementis a course that provides students with the content established by the College Board.  Topics include: (1) functions, graphs, and limits: analysis of graphs, limits of functions, asymptotic and unbounded behavior, continuity as a property of functions (2) derivatives: concepts of the derivative, derivative at a point, derivative as a function, second derivatives, application and computation of derivatives, and (3) integrals: interpretations and properties of definite integrals, applications of integrals, fundamental theorem of calculus, techniques of antidifferentiation, and numerical approximations to definite integrals.  The use of graphing technology is required. A comprehensive description of this course can be found on the College Board AP Central Course Description web page at:
http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/courses/descriptions/index.html

2562: Calculus  (Oakland City course: MATH 216, 4 hours)
This is a high school level calculus course that will develop a student’s understanding of both derivatives and integrals of algebraic, trigonometric, and logarithmic functions. 

SCIENCE

3024: Biology I (L)  (Oakland City Course: BIO 101, 3hrs)

Biology I provides, through regular laboratory and field investigations, a study of the structures and functions of living organisms and their interactions with their environment. At a minimum, this study explores the functions and processes of cells, tissues, organs, and systems within various species of living organisms and the roles and interdependencies of organisms within populations, communities, ecosystems, and the biosphere. Students have opportunities to: (1) gain an understanding of the history of the development of biological knowledge, (2) explore the uses of biology in various careers, and (3) investigate biological questions and problems related to personal needs and social issues.

3026: Biology II (L) (Oakland City Course: BIO 111, 4hrs)
Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency in writing, reading, and computation through appropriate assessment or successful completion of Biology I & Chemistry I with a 'C' or better.  Introduces the basic concepts of life. Includes discussion of cellular and organismal biology, genetics, evolution, ecology, and interaction among all living organisms. It addresses applications of biology to society.

3064: Chemistry I (L) 
Chemistry I allows students to synthesize useful models of the structure of matter and the mechanisms of its interactions through laboratory investigations of matter and chemical reactions. Students have opportunities to: (1) gain an understanding of the history of chemistry, (2) explore the uses of chemistry in various careers, (3) investigate chemical questions and problems related to personal needs and social issues, and (4) learn and practice laboratory safety.

3066: Chemistry II

Chemistry II provides for extended laboratory and literature investigations of the chemical reactions of matter in living and nonliving materials. This course stresses the unifying themes of chemistry, the development of physical and mathematical models of matter and its interactions, and the methods of scientific inquiry.

3066DC: Chemistry (L), Dual Credit    (Oakland City Course: CHEM 101, 5hrs)

Laws and principles of chemistry including stoichiometry, gas laws, atomic and molecular structure, nomenclature and equation writing and balancing. Numerical problems and relationships and introduced whenever quantitative treatment is possible.

3108: Integrated Chemistry-Physics (L)
Integrated Chemistry-Physics introduces the fundamental concepts of scientific inquiry, the structure of matter, chemical reactions, forces, motion, and the interactions between energy and matter. This course will serve students as a laboratory-based introduction to possible future course work in chemistry or physics while ensuring a mastery of the basics of each discipline. The ultimate goal of the course is to produce scientifically literate citizens capable of using their knowledge of physical science to solve real-world problems and to make personal, social, and ethical decisions that have consequences beyond the classroom walls.

3084: Physics (L)   (Oakland City Course: PHY 101, 4hrs)
Physics I aids students in synthesizing the fundamental concepts and principles concerning matter and energy through the laboratory study of mechanics, wave motion, heat, light, electricity, magnetism, electromagnetism, and atomic and nuclear physics. Students have opportunities to: (1) acquire an awareness of the history of physics and its role in the birth of technology, (2) explore the uses of its models, theories, and laws in various careers, and (3) investigate physics questions and problems related to personal needs and social issues.

5074: Advanced Life Science, Plants and Soils (L)   (Oakland City Course: BIO 220, 4hrs)
Advanced Life Science, Plant and Soil, is a standards-based, interdisciplinary science course that integrates the study of advanced biology, chemistry, and earth science in an agricultural context.  Students enrolled in this course formulate, design, and implement agriculturally-based laboratory and field investigations as an essential course component.  These extended laboratory and literature investigations focus on the chemical reactions of matter in living and nonliving materials while stressing the unifying themes of chemistry and the development of physical and mathematical models of matter and its interactions.  Using the principles of scientific inquiry, students examine the internal structures, functions, genetics, and processes of living plant organisms and their interaction with the environmental.  Students completing this course will be able to apply the principles of scientific inquiry to solve problems related to both biology and chemistry in the context of highly advanced agricultural applications of plants and soils.  
Students having completed one year of Biology and one year of Chemistry and are in the upper 50% of their class may apply for dual credit from Purdue University.  Students may make this choice at the end of the first semester.  Students would receive four college credits for Botany 210.  The cost to receive college credit in 2008 was $340.00 which is a savings of over $700.00.

3008: Science Research, Independent Study (L) 
Science Research, Independent Study is a course that provides students with unique opportunities for independent, in-depth study of one or more specific scientific problems. Students develop a familiarity with the laboratory procedures used in a given educational, research, or industrial setting or a variety of such settings.  Students enrolled in this course will complete a science fair project to be exhibited at a regional science fair and/or state science symposium, an end-of-course project, such as a scientific research paper, or some other suitable presentation of their findings.

SOCIAL STUDIES

1540: United States Government (POLITICAL STUDIES) (Oakland City Course: GOV 101, 3hrs)
This course provides an opportunity for the student to explore the governing process, to study in depth the elements of political theory and all levels of governmental structures.  The course consists of a study of the U.S. Constitution and its basis for governing, the legislative, executive and judicial processes, and the different functions of local, state, and national government.  REQUIRED OF ALL STUDENTS FOR GRADUATION.

1514: Economics (POLITICAL STUDIES) (Oakland City Course: ECON 202, 3hrs)
This is the study of man's efforts to overcome scarcity of goods.  Through lecture and discussion, economic ideas, production, money and credit, prices, governmental regulation, international problems, stabilization, and personal economics are studied. REQUIRED OF ALL STUDENTS FOR GRADUATION.

1542: United States History (AMERICAN STUDIES)

Semester 1: (Oakland City Course: HIS 241, 3hrs)

Semester 2: (Oakland City Course: HIS 242, 3hrs)

U.S. History is a requirement for graduation from high school in the state of Indiana.  U.S. History allows the student the discovery, exploration, settlement, and growth of the United States.  It includes a survey of political, social, and economic progress to the present time.  The primary emphasis will be on 20th century American history. REQUIRED OF ALL STUDENTS FOR GRADUATION.

1518: Indiana Studies

(Oakland City Course: HIST 201, 3hrs)

Indiana Studies is an integrated program comparing and contrasting state and national development in the areas of politics, , history, and culture. The course uses Indiana history as a basis for understanding current policies, practices, and state legislative procedures. Students acquire motivation to participate in the political process as concerned citizens. This course also includes the study of state and national constitutions from a historical perspective and as a current foundation of government. The examination of individual leaders and their roles in a democratic society should be included. Selections from Indiana arts and literature might also be analyzed for insights into historical events and cultural expressions.

1528: Modern World Civilization

(Oakland City Course: HIS 103, 3hrs)

Modern World Civilizationprovides an in-depth look at the twentieth century world. It is a study of different cultures as they exist in the world today, including a comparative analysis of the various types of governmental, economic, and social systems. International relationships are examined partly from the viewpoint of national interest, including the successes and failures of diplomacy.

1548: World History and Civilization (WORLD STUDIES)

World History(Oakland City Course: HIS 101, 3hrs)

English 9 (Oakland City Course: ENG 201, 3hrs)

World History is a full year course.  It emphasizes events and developments in the past that greatly affected large numbers of people across broad areas of the earth and that significantly influenced peoples and places in subsequent eras.  Some key events and developments pertain primarily to particular people and place; others, by contrast, involve transcultural interactions and exchanges between various peoples and places in different parts of the world.  Students are expected to practice skills and processes of historical thinking and inquiry that involve chronological thinking, comprehension, analysis and interpretation, research, issues-analysis, and decision-making.  They are expected to compare and contrast events and developments involving diverse peoples and civilizations in different regions of the world. Students are expected to examine examples of continuity and change, universality and particularity, and unity and diversity among various peoples and cultures from the past to the present.  Finally, students are expected to apply content knowledge to the practice of thinking and inquiry skills and processes.  There should be continuous and pervasive interactions of processes and content, skills and substance, in the teaching and learning of history.

1532: Psychology

(Oakland City Course: PSY 101, 3hrs)

Psychology is the scientific study of mental processes and behavior.  The Standards have been divided into six content areas.  These areas include: Scientific Methods, Developmental, Cognitive, Personality, Assessment and Mental Health, Socio-cultural and Biological Bases of Behavior.  In the Scientific Methods area, research methods and ethical considerations are discussed.  Developmental psychology takes a life span approach to physical, cognitive, language, emotional, social, and moral development.  Cognitive aspects of psychology focuses on learning, memory, information processing, and language.  Personality, Assessment and Mental Health topics include psychological disorders, treatment, personality, and assessment.  Socio-cultural dimensions of behavior deal with topics such as conformity, obedience, perceptions, attitudes, and the influence of the group on the individual.  The Biological Bases focuses on the way the brain and nervous system functions, including topics such as sensation, perception motivation, and emotion.
This class will examine the basic principles of Psychology.  Students will spend a lot of time throughout the course examining and explaining human behavior.   Course will look at the different psychological approaches and how they each offer unique ways of understanding human behavior and the mind.

1534: Sociology

(Oakland City Course: Soc 201, 3hrs)

Sociology provides opportunities for students to study human social behavior from a group perspective.  The sociological perspective is a distinct method of studying recurring patterns in people’s attitudes and actions and how these patterns vary across time, among cultures, and in social groups.  Students will describe the development of sociology as a social science and identify methods and strategies of research.  Students will analyze a range of social problems in today’s world and examine the role of the individual as a member of the community.
This class examines the basic principles of Sociology.  It focuses on the influence society has on groups and individual’s behaviors.  Students will take a closer look at social institutions (education, religion, and family), crime/deviance, culture, socialization, and social structure.  A major part of the course will be devoted to students understanding the three sociological perspectives examined in the class (functionalist, interactionalist, and conflict).

 

1538: Topics in History-“From Elvis to YouTube: A Cultural History of America from 1950 to Today”

This course will begin with the rise of Elvis Presley in the 1950s and continue into the 21st Century with the ultimate goal of exploring the relationships between America’s rise as a world power and it’s direct affect on the culture of its citizens.  Topics covered will include (but not be limited to): landing on the moon, 1960s counterculture, Watergate, 1980s consumerism, the rise of computers, and living in a digital world. Students will watch important movies and documentaries as well as read important articles to provide context to this vibrant period in American History.  Additionally, students will have writing opportunities and chances to discuss class materials. 

1538: Topics in History
Topics In History provides students the opportunity to study specific historical eras, events, or concepts.  Development of historical research skills using primary and secondary sources is emphasized.  The course focuses on one or more topics or themes related to United States or world history.  Examples of topics might include: (1) twentieth- century conflict, (2) the American West, (3) the history of the United States Constitution, and (4) democracy in history.

SECONDARY PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

3506: Health and Wellness Education (Oakland City Course: PE 210, 3hrs)

Students enrolled in health education will be provided with a basis to continue methods of developing knowledge, concepts, skills, behaviors, and attitudes related to health and well being.  Major content areas included in the curriculum are growth and development, mental and emotional health, personal health, intentional and unintentional injury, health promotion, and disease prevention.  Other content areas will meet the standards set forth by the state of Indiana.  Students will also explore the effects of health behaviors on an individual's quality of life, understand that health is a lifetime commitment and be able to analyze risk factors and health decisions that promote health and prevent disease, as well as become competent in the area of being a good health consumer. REQUIRED OF ALL STUDENTS FOR GRADUATION.

3542: Physical Education I (L)
Students who are enrolled in physical education I (L) will study with an emphasis on health related fitness and developmental skills and habits.  Along with skill development will be the application of rules, strategies, and different movement forms.  The different movement forms will come under the categories of health related fitness, team sports, outdoor pursuits, and recreational games.  Evaluation will come in the form of skill and written tests. REQUIRED OF ALL STUDENTS FOR GRADUATION.

3544: Physical Education II (L) 
Students who are enrolled in physical education II will learn to set up programs that will teach them to personally commit themselves to a lifetime of activity and fitness.  They learn the importance of finding an activity that they enjoy, will challenge them, and will provide some social interaction.  Students will have the opportunity to learn to achieve and maintain levels of personal fitness through fitness knowledge and concepts that will last a lifetime.
The different forms of movement will come under the categories of health related fitness, aerobic exercise, aquatics, individual and dual sports, and aquatics.  Evaluation will come in the form of skill and written tests. REQUIRED OF ALL STUDENTS FOR GRADUATION.

3560: Elective Physical Education (L) (Oakland City course: PE 201, 2 hours)
Students who are enrolled in a physical education elective will pursue the concepts of health related fitness activities, team sports, individual and dual sports, aquatics, and outdoor pursuits.   They will also learn the principles of sport and exercise in relation to the human body.  At this level, skills and attitudes will be refined to promote lifetime fitness habits.

TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION

Technology Education provides learning activities to develop interpersonal, mathematical, scientific skill, and social dimensions to prepare students to become more productive citizens in a rapidly changing technological society.  The courses encourage students to develop the knowledge, problem solving skills, and techniques that can be applied to future careers and educational pursuits.  They will learn to use tools, machines and computers to produce product/services.

5644: Introduction to Engineering Design (PROJECT LEAD THE WAY) (Oakland City Course: DFT 103, 3hrs)
An introductory course which develops student problem solving skills with emphasis placed on the development of three-dimensional solid models.  Students will work from sketching simple geometric shapes to applying a solid modeling computer software package.  They will learn a problem solving design process and how it is used in industry to manufacture a product.  The Computer Aided Design system (CAD) will also be used to analyze and evaluate the product design.  The techniques learned, and equipment used, is state of the art and are currently being used by engineers throughout the United States. 

5644P: Principles of Engineering (PROJECT LEAD THE WAY) (Oakland City Course: DFT 203, 3hrs)
Principles of Engineering is a broad-based survey course designed to help students understand the field of engineering and engineering technology and its career possibilities.  Students will develop engineering problem solving skills that are involved in postsecondary education programs and engineering careers.  They will also learn how engineers address concerns about the social and political consequences of technological change.

5538 : Digital Electronics (PROJECT LEAD THE WAY) (Oakland City Course: DFT 102, 3hrs)
Digital Electronicsis a course of study in applied digital logic that encompasses the design and application of electronic circuits and devices found in video games, watches, calculators, digital cameras, and thousands of other devices. Instruction includes the application of engineering and scientific principles as well as the use of Boolean algebra to solve design problems. Using computer software that reflects current industry standards, activities should provide opportunities for students to design, construct, test, and analyze simple and complex digital circuitry.

 

5644: Engineering Design and Development (PROJECT LEAD THE WAY)
Engineering Design and Development is designed to introduce students to the fundamental aspects of engineering and engineering technology. Instruction will emphasize underlying principles of engineering processes and the development of three-dimensional solid models. Instructional activities will build skills ranging from sketching simple geometric shapes to applying a solid modeling computer software package. Students will develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills through instructional activities that pose design and application challenges for which they develop solutions. The techniques learned, and equipment used, should be state of the art and reflect equipment and processes currently being used by engineers throughout the United States.

  • Recommended Grade Level: 12
  • Recommended Prerequisites: Completion of three Project Lead The Way courses
  • Credits: A two credit, two semester course.   
  • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas
  • A Career Academic Sequence, Career-Technical program, or Flex Credit Course 

4780: Communication Systems     
The course will offer a broad exposure to the field of communication and develop more effective communication skills.  The students will produce graphic and electronic media as they explore techniques used to apply technology in communicating information and ideas.  Students will learn the basics of radio, television, and digital photography.

4790: Communication Processes 
This course will introduce you to all aspects of radio broadcasting and television production.  You will learn how D.J.'s and technicians do their jobs behind the scenes.  Further, if your dream is to either be a producer, camera person or a newscaster, this is for you. The mock school television station will be set up to record and broadcast announcements, highlights of sporting events or other important community news.

4782: Construction Systems 
This is a one semester course.  This course is an introduction to the construction industry.  Students will explore techniques used to apply technology in producing residential, commercial, and industrial buildings and a variety of civil structures.  All areas of construction materials and processes will be covered from site selection through occupancy.  Lab activities will include project idea development, research, reduced scale or full size construction.

4792: Construction Processes  
This is a one semester course.  Students will learn the business operation areas of construction.  As a group they will form a construction company and develop a construction project that considers the business aspects as well as the construction of a project.

4784: Manufacturing Systems                
This is a one semester course.  This introduces the students to manufacturing technology and its relationship with society, individuals, and the environment. They will also have managed activities which are used to develop, produce, use and assess production technology.  Students will look at the technical process of manufacturing a product in a formed group, custom, or intermittent production.  These products can be made of metal, plastic, wood, or other materials.  They will learn to use the machines related to woods and metals.

4796: Manufacturing Processes 
This is a one semester course. Students will look at the technical process of manufacturing of a product in custom or intermittent production.  These products can be made of metal, plastic, wood or other materials.  They will also learn the processes used to obtain resources and change them into industrial materials and finished industrial and consumer products.

4786: Transportation Systems 
This is a one semester course. This course explores the application of tools, materials, and energy in designing, producing, using and assessing transportation systems.   The student will also apply research techniques, creative problem solving skills, and technological principals in identifying, testing, and communicating solutions to problems or opportunities.  Students will study/apply the techniques in technology to move people and cargo in vehicles on land water, air and space.  This course may include the following projects:  Super mileage car, Hovercraft, Solar vehicle or other related activities.

4798: Transportation Processes 
This is a one semester course. This course explores the technological processes used to move people and cargo in vehicles and by other means on land and in water, air, and space. This course is broken into 2 parts, focusing on the movement of parts (cargo and freight), and people (driver, passengers, crew, etc.)  This course will include projects related to water transportation and air transportation.

 

4804: Technology & Society

(Must have passed Construction Systems and Construction Processes)

As technologies become more powerful and integrated across societies, the ability to forsee the social, economic, and environmental consequences of their development has become increasingly critical. Emphasis is put on the supervision of completing different construction projects, researching the different trends of construction as it relates to more efficient structures. The class and lab activities have been structured to allow students to focus on their roles in management and control of technology.

 

 

4806: Technology Enterprises

 (Must have passed Manufacturing Systems and Manufacturing Processes)

With the global desire for new products and services, enterprises strive to meet these human needs with quality goods, structures, and services. In a competitive marketplace, today’s enterprises must be developed and operated in an efficient manner. That is the goal of Technology Enterprise class…structuring, supervise the making of a product to sell in a real life enterprise in a classroom environment. The students will realize the many problems related to a enterprise in its organization, management, and operation.

 

4808: Technology Systems

(Must have passed Transportation Systems and Transportation Processes)

With the expansion of Transportation in moving goods more efficiently, this class focus is on the study of the most economical ways to move products from one place to the other. This course will focus on real world problems and opportunities related to transportation. Students will take part in the development of the Super Mileage Team, developing strategies, designs, marketing and management of team members. There will also be projects related to how Transportation effects the environment and devising effective solutions.

 

CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION

General Admission Requirements 
Admission to Twin Rivers Career and Technical Education Area programs will be dependent upon several factors.  In general, each student will be expected to have:
1.  A sincere interest in Career-Technical Education.
2.  A permissive academic schedule.
3.  Proper attitude toward school and work.
4.  Good health
5.  Ability to meet specific requirements of a particular course.
6.  COMPLETED THE 10TH GRADE!
7.  Proper attitude toward strict class rules and regulations.
8.  Parental permission and school counselor recommendation.
**9.  Have a means of own transportation.
**10. MUST HAVE A GOOD ATTENDANCE RECORD.

Twin Rivers Career & Technical Education Area Programs

5510: Automotive Services Technology
CIP Code: 47.0604
Automotive Services Technology includes classroom and laboratory experiences that incorporate training in service and repair work on all types of automotive vehicles.  Included in the course is training in the use of service/repair information and a variety of hand and power tools.  Instruction and practice provides opportunities for students to diagnose malfunctions, disassemble units, perform parts inspections, and repair and replace parts.  Course content should address NATEF/ ASE standards leading to certification in one or more of the following areas:  steering and suspension; brakes; engine performance; manual transmissions and differential; automatic transmissions; electrical systems; air conditioning; and, engine repair. Mathematical skills will be reinforced through precision measuring activities and cost estimation/calculation activities.  Scientific principles taught and reinforced in this course include the study of viscosity, friction, thermal expansion, and compound solutions.  Written and oral skills will also be emphasized to help students communicate with customers, colleagues, and supervisors.

5580: Building Trades Technology
CIP Codes: 46.0201 (Carpenter); 46.0101 (Mason/Tile Setter); 46.0503 (Plumber) 46.0302 (Electrician); 49.0202 (Construction Equipment Operator)
Building Trades Technology includes classroom and laboratory experiences concerned with the erection, installation, maintenance, and repair of buildings, homes, and other structures using
assorted materials such as metal, wood, stone, brick, glass, concrete, or composite materials.
Instruction covers a variety of activities such as cost estimating; cutting, fitting, fastening, and finishing various materials; the uses of a variety of hand and power tools; and, blueprint reading and following technical specifications.  Knowledge concerning the physical properties of materials should also be emphasized.  Instruction in plastering, masonry, tile setting, dry wall installation, plumbing, residential wiring and roofing should be covered in the course of study.  Additional areas of instruction can include operation and maintenance of heavy equipment used in the construction industry and processes used for digging, grading, clearing, and excavating.  Students will develop accurate and precise measuring skills and an advanced understanding of volume and area calculations as well as the advanced mathematical skills required for construction of rafters, stair stringers, and complex angles.  Estimation skills will be strengthened through activities such as ordering of materials and planning construction jobs.  Scientific principles will be reinforced through weight load exercises, span length determinations, and the study of relative strength.  Reading skills as well as oral and written communication skills will also be emphasized to ensure students’ abilities to accurately interpret instructions and provide information to customers and colleagues.

5802: Cosmetology 
CIP Code: 12.0401
Cosmetology includes classroom and practical experiences concerned with a variety of
beauty treatments, including the beautification of hair and skin care.  Instruction includes training in giving shampoos, rinses, and scalp treatments; hair styling, setting, cutting, dyeing, tinting, bleaching, and fitting wigs; permanent waving; facials; manicuring; and, hand and arm massaging.  Scientific knowledge related to bacteriology, anatomy, hygiene, and sanitation will be emphasized.  Additional instruction in the areas of small business (salon) management, record keeping, and customer relations should also be provided in this course.  Instruction should be designed to qualify students for the licensing examination.

5282: Health Careers
CIP Code: 51.xxxx – Determined by course content 
Health Careers content includes a core of entry level skills common to one specific health career such as patient nursing care, dental care, animal care, medical laboratory, and public health.   Course content includes an introduction to health care systems, anatomy, physiology, and medical terminology. Included are leadership skills developed through membership in the student youth organization, HOSA. During the second semester, instruction is integrated with core entry-level skills. The concept of coping with illness is also introduced. In addition, this course includes work ethics and job seeking skills such as job applications, resumes, and interviews. An in-school laboratory provides hands-on, simulated experiences. 
The instructor and the students should move from the local school to the actual health care clinical setting for pre-planned, educational experiences which are to be coordinated and evaluated by the school. The pre-planned activities provide an opportunity for the students to apply the knowledge, skills, and attitudes learned in the classroom. Actual instruction and supervision, usually provided on a one-to-one basis, is given by qualified health practitioners in the clinical setting, based on pre-determined specific learning competencies.

Vincennes University Programs